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Live New Zealand - Live in New Zealand - Living in New Zealand

Living New Zealand - Living in New Zealand

Live in New Zealand

Living Costs New Zealand

New Zealand has a comparatively decent standard of living as compared to other developed countries such the United States and Australia. Although average wages are lower than these countries, it costs more to relocate to New Zealand from these countries, hence, the high standard of living.

If you work and earn NZ dollars, then tourists, travellers and students will find that their own home currency buys more than the NZ dollar. But, the benefit of this is that people who are home owners in their home country can use this as equity to fund their mortgage as part of a lower deal.

Another positive for newcomers to New Zealand is that fees for school education can be significantly reduced if the area you live in has a good number of public schools.

In addition, since New Zealand is an island nation, travelling to the coast is no more than a short drive. Plus, family outings don‘t cost the earth and picnics for the whole family will fit into a reasonable family budget.

In fact, research has revealed that New Zealand’s standard of living is much more affordable than that of Australia.

Auckland, NZ’s major city has a much better cost of living than its Australian counterpart, Sydney.

Buying food in New Zealand is cost-competitive. In fact, chicken and lamb meat products cost no more than $15.00 on average. Clothing such as shirts and jeans cost upwards from $25.00 and Takeaways and the cinema cost less than $11.00.

Live in New Zealand

Cultural and Social life in New Zealand

New Zealand is a diverse and multicultural country and has benefited from waves of migration over the last century. The locals are very friendly and hospitable to all newcomers to their country. Equal opportunity legislation and New Zealand immigration policy safeguards the rights of all citizens and is enforced by the Human Rights Commission. Sexual harassment and discrimination is illegal and the Human Rights Commission is the main body that deals with enforcing this legislation.

Indoor/outdoor living

New Zealand's temperate climate allows for a variety of outdoor recreational activities such as walking and going to the beach.

New Zealand consists of it's two main islands the north island and the south island

New Zealand is a smaller country with just over four million people calling it home. Which is a great thing giving you more time to enjoy everything New Zealand has to offer including it's spectacular beaches, snow fields, mountain ranges, historic towns and bustling cities. Located between tranquil waters of the Pacific and Tasman oceans makes for amazing scenery, surf and beaches.

New Zealanders of kiwis as they may be better known, enjoy a relaxed and more outdoor lifestyle. With the natural wonders New Zealand has to offer it's no wonder some of the main sporting interests here are mountain biking, skiing, surfing and snow boarding. How ever you can't leave out the All Blacks New Zealands national rugby team who they are very proud of and show great support for.

As most of the world is currently having economic difficulties it may come as a surprise that New Zealand currently has more jobs available then they do people to do them. If you have experience, qualifications and are a skilled worker then there is no better place then New Zealand to find yourself a new job.

Many of those who will come to work in New Zealand will end up working and living in either the capital city of Wellington or the two other main cities being Auckland and Christchurch. Buying and Renting in New Zealand is still affordable, making for a nice change from other western countries.

As you can see New Zealand is not only a beautiful place to visit but also an exciting place to live.

Live in New Zealand

New Zealand… It is a beautiful country in the Southern Hempisphere with a low cost of living and for University students – low fees and a plethora of advantages!

For international students the benefits of studying in New Zealand are numerous and given its multicultural base it makes integration easy.

The New Zealand education system is based on the British education system which makes it possible for students to study their undergraduate degree in New Zealand and their post-graduate degree in a different English-speaking country.

New Zealand also provides their international students with plenty of employment options. If an international student is studying a fulltime course for more than a year then they are entitled to work full time during holiday periods as well as a maximum of 20 hours per week during the term.

Partners (spouses) of the students who are studying in areas of skill shortage (one such area is IT) can apply for a work permit which would be viable for the duration of the course.

And for those international students who have graduated from a course of study in New Zealand, they will be free to seek a six month employment permit as well as receive extra points in the general skills category of their permanent residence application.

Taking up an education in New Zealand ensures international students are provided with a decreased cost of living (whilst the living environment is spectacular) as well as all these advantages, advantages which other countries do not offer.

Life in New Zealand - Living New Zealand: take a look at some useful links to help you live in the country comfortably. These are Work Visas, student welfare program, and more.

Living New Zealand - Living in New Zealand

Popular for its low crime rates (the police don’t even need to carry guns); New Zealand has got to be one of the safest places in the world to live. It is a democratic country run on the Westminster parliamentary system.

New Zealand is free of abject poverty and hunger and doesn’t live by class systems. It promotes freedom of speech, expression and religious beliefs. New Zealand is certainly a country of equal opportunity! Whilst New Zealand prides itself on being a liberal country there are laws which it enforces and quite fairly so. Alcohol consumption is prohibited for those under the age of 18, the first stage of driver’s licensing is not permitted until the age of 15, drug usage and selling is strictly illegal, only permanent residents may apply for firearm permits, discrimination is not acceptable and smoking restrictions are placed in public places.

The environment isn’t congested with the pollution so many other places have due to over crowding of the cities and even though New Zealand is tucked away in the Southern Hemisphere it remains multiculturally diverse. In fact with just over four million people living in New Zealand, most are either immigrants or descended from immigrants.

The public health systems in New Zealand are world standard with essential health care provided free as well as government subsidies for low income earners. The hospitals are clean and maintain a high standard.

Many employment categories for immigrants are available and include: The Skilled Migrant Category (for those who have skill/qualifications/experiences much needed in New Zealand), Work to Residence (allowing temporary working visas for those seeking permanent residence) and the Relocating Company Category (where key employees are required by companies moving to New Zealand).

One New Zealand dollar is equivalent to 0.45 Euros so clearly the cost of living in the “Land of the Long White Cloud” is economical. Their prices for consumers are competitive and the cost of housing is so reduced that around two thirds of the population of New Zealand own their own homes. Housing is varied with inner-city apartments and houses on the market alongside townhouses with views of the seaside, suburban homes and small rural farmlets.

With so much to offer, not to mention by such a welcoming, friendly people it would be hard to find a better, more stable and secure country than New Zealand.

Living in New Zealand

Living in New Zealand is Fun though Students must Take Care of the Cost of Living, Job-Prospects and Tough Climate Conditions

New Zealand is a picturesque country that commands a high rate of expatriates from all parts of the world. Tourists, working-holiday travelers, international students, and skilled foreigners regularly throng the place with a hope for greener pastures in this country. Nevertheless, one must take care of basic needs while living in New Zealand.

Although New Zealand is not a very big country, yet it has diverse topography and many islands. Most of the populated cities are in North Island while South Island mainly constitutes scenic landscapes, mountainous terrain, and forests. Living in New Zealand is not difficult, unless however, international students or travelers take care of the basic needs. For instance, cost of living is high, English requirement is quite stringent, especially for people coming from non-English speaking countries, and climate is at times quite extreme.

Cost of Living
Living cost in New Zealand is moderately high. Normal expenditure could turn out to be $300 per week. Generally, electricity, phone, and net connections are part and parcel of the lives of the people. Surveys have showed that yearly income for households amounted to 60,000 Euro PPP. However, compared to the income, expenditure is low. Consumer goods are available at low rates, service tax is little more than 10 percent, and price of clothing is also low.

Economy
New Zealand is noted for its dairy farming, farming for seasonal fruits and vegetables, and textile manufacturing units. Consequently, the income of the people is high and good amount of the products from farmland, wineries, and breweries are exported each year. Hundreds of international students come over on working holiday visa and student visa to work part-time in these farms. Some work on voluntary basis also.

Accommodation
There are different types of accommodation available in New Zealand. While there are luxury hotels, suites, and guest houses, there are also affordable hostels, farmstays, and homestays. International students are often invited by the colleges and universities to stay at various homestays to avail secured and affordable accommodation. An exclusive one-night stay at a plush hotel would cost around $600.

Working in New Zealand
To work in the country for 1-2 years you must have a Working Holiday Visa (WHV), which are available under 25 schemes for various countries. A foreigner must also possess an IRD number from New Zealand Inland Revenue, without which you can be tax heavily under emergency tax code. Having a bank account would an added advantage. But you must have permanent New Zealand address for it.

With these tit-bits in mind, living in New Zealand is an attractive proposition for foreigners.

Live in New Zealand

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A day in the life of New Zealanders

New Zealanders are a combination of a wide range of different ethnic groups and cultural heritages so it is impossible to present an accurate picture of what life is like in "an average New Zealand home".

When visiting or staying with New Zealand families, you may witness a striking difference in lifestyles and routines from the families with similar backgrounds.

Family life

Generally, New Zealand families are small with two generations living under the same roof, thus, extended family is less common.

Both men and women are expected to help with the family life, though in some families the specific chores men do will be different to those undertaken by women. Either the mother or the father may assume the role of 'head of the house' or it may be shared by both parents.

Many children in New Zealand leave their family homes when they start university or when they leave school. In the past, it was common for New Zealanders to leave their family home before they were 20 years old, but today more tertiary students and school leavers are choosing to remain living with their parents during early adulthood.

A typical day

The day generally starts when most people get up at about 7.00am during weekdays and a bit later at weekends. During the week, work and school start at around 8.30am and end at about 5pm (school for children ends at around 3pm).

Lunch is often a light meal taken between 12.00-2.00pm. People rarely return home for a large meal and hot food is available at many food outlets.

It is a tradition for the majority of New Zealanders to spend time together in the evening: having dinner, talking or watching television together. Ordinarily, people go to sleep between 9.00pm and 11.00pm.

At the weekends, quite a few people go out in the evenings to bars, restaurants, cafes or movies. It is usually only on Friday nights and during weekends that people stay up late.

Source: Ministry of Education, New Zealand

A snapshot of New Zealanders

New Zealanders

Most New Zealanders are pretty friendly and are interested in learning about other people's culture and society. For this reason, they like to ask questions about you and your country, and are happy for you to ask questions about them and about New Zealand in general.

However, bear in mind that you should not ask questions about one's income and age which are considered as personal privacy. Furthermore, personal comments such as, "You're quite bald", or "You've put on weight", "She is skinny" or "His hair is very grey" are also seen inappropriate unless it is a very close friend or family member.

You will find New Zealanders vary greatly with regard to how reserved they are in expressing emotion or affection openly. When meeting friends and family, for example, a simple hello is usually all that takes place unless it has been a long time since the last time they met. New Zealanders seldom cry, raise their voices or get very angry or upset in public.

Socialising

Young New Zealanders (over 18 years of age) often get together in pubs, bars or caf?s rather than in restaurants, which can be costly. It is acceptable not to drink alcohol when socialising.

Meeting people

New Zealanders often shake hands when meeting each other for the first time.

On most occasions you cannot simply turn up without making an appointment in advance, even  with friends. And it is important to be on time for meeting someone or attending an event or class, etc.

Sex in the society

New Zealand is a very open society, therefore, men and women integrate freely, are treated in the same way and take on similar roles in society.

However, women are often in positions of authority such as business leaders, and politicians, and the role of the wife/mother in a New Zealand family may be slightly different from what you are used to.

Clothing

On most occasions New Zealanders dress informally but relatively conservatively. It is not uncommon however, to see men wearing shorts and no shirts, and women wearing sleeveless tops and short skirts during the summer.

Keep in mind

* New Zealanders drive on the left-hand side of the road. It is seldom to hear the car horn.

* New Zealanders prefer to walk on the left-hand side of the pavement to avoid collisions with other pedestrians.

* New Zealanders find it offensive to spit and litter the streets.

* New Zealanders prefer love outdoor entertainment. Popular sports include rugby, cricket and netball.

*'First come, first served' is applied to any places such as at shopping malls or post offices, which means queuing is required.

Religion

According to 2006 Census information, the major religion is Christian. Others  include Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism and Judaism. The best way to contact religious groups and organisations is to look in the phone book, under the 'Churches and Religious Organisations' section of the Yellow Pages or under the name of the religious group or denomination in the White Pages.

Source: Ministry of Education, New Zealand